You’re Eating Sushi All Wrong

Nigirizushi (握り寿司, lit. hand-formed sushi) consists of an oblong mound of sushi rice that the chef presses into a small rectangular box between the palms of the hands, usually with a bit of wasabi, and a topping draped over it. Unlike sashimi, which is almost always eaten with chopsticks, nigirizushi is traditionally eaten with the fingers, even in formal settings

Wasabi is often served with sushi or sashimi, usually accompanied with soy sauce.

Soy sauce is a condiment produced by fermenting soybeans with Aspergillus oryzae and Aspergillus soyae molds, along with water and salt. All varieties of soy sauce are salty, earthy, brownish liquids intended to season food while cooking or at the table. Soy sauce has a distinct basic taste called umami (旨味, literally “delicious taste”) in Japanese.

Takeru Kobayashi vs Takako Akasaka

Other world-eating records held by [Takeru] Kobayashi include 17.7 pounds of cow brains in 15 minutes and 20 pounds (9 kg) of rice balls in 30 minutes.

Takako Akasaka (Japanese: 赤阪尊子 Akasaka Takako b. February 24, 1955) is a Japanese competitive eater from Osaka, Japan. She is considered the most successful female competitive eater in Japan.

Akasaka is known as an excellent long-distance eater, specializing in sweet food, which earned her the nickname “The Sweet Queen” or “The Queen” among her admirers.

The Japanese word gyōza (ギョーザ, ギョウザ) was derived from the reading of 餃子 (Jiaozi in Mandarin Chinese) in the Shandong Chinese dialect (giaozi) and is written using the same Chinese characters.

The most prominent difference of Japanese-style gyōza from Chinese style jiaozi is the rich garlic flavor, which is less noticeable in the Chinese version, and the fact that Japanese-style gyōza are very lightly flavored with salt, soy, etc. Therefore, they are always served with soy-based dipping sauce (tare) seasoned with rice vinegar and/or rāyu (ラー油, known as làyóu (辣油) in China, red chili pepper-flavored sesame oil). The most common recipe found in Japan is a mixture of minced pork, garlic, cabbage, and nira (Chinese chives), and sesame oil, which is then wrapped into thinly-rolled dough skins.

National Geographic Puffer Fish

Fugu is a Japanese dish prepared from the meat of pufferfish (normally species of Takifugu, Lagocephalus, or Sphoeroides) or porcupinefish of the genus Diodon. Because pufferfish is lethally poisonous if prepared incorrectly, fugu has become one of the most celebrated and notorious dishes in Japanese cuisine.

Tsukiji (築地) is a district of Chuo-ku, Tokyo, Japan, the site of the Tsukiji fish market. Literally meaning “reclaimed land,” it lies near the Sumida River on land reclaimed from Tokyo Bay in the 1700s, during the Edo period.