Sushi The Japanese Tradition

Sushi as an English word has come to refer to the complete dish (rice together with toppings); this is the sense used in this article. The original term Japanese: 寿司 sushi (-zushi in some compounds such as makizushi), written with kanji (Chinese characters) refers to the rice, not the fish or other toppings.

In contemporary usage, a parody is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. As literary theorist Linda Hutcheon puts it, “parody…is imitation with a critical difference, not always at the expense of the parodied text.” Another critic, Simon Dentith, defines parody as “any cultural practice which provides a relatively polemical allusive imitation of another cultural production or practice.”

Kizakura Sake (1959)

Sake (Japanese: 酒) is a Japanese word meaning “alcoholic beverage”, which in English has come to refer to a specific alcoholic beverage brewed mainly from rice, and known in Japan as either nihonshu (日本酒 “Japanese alcohol”) or sake. This article uses the word “sake” as it is used in English.

Kappa (河童, Kappa “river-child”), alternately called Gatarō (川太郎, Gatarō “river-boy”) or Kawako (川子, Kawako “river-girl”) , are legendary creatures; a type of water imp found in Japanese folklore. However they are also considered to be a part of cryptozoology, due to apparent sightings. In Shintoism they are considered to be one of many suijin (literally “water-deity”).

Kizakura Sake (1961)

Sake (Japanese: 酒) is a Japanese word meaning “alcoholic beverage”, which in English has come to refer to a specific alcoholic beverage brewed mainly from rice, and known in Japan as either nihonshu (日本酒 “Japanese alcohol”) or sake. This article uses the word “sake” as it is used in English.

Kappa (河童, Kappa “river-child”), alternately called Gatarō (川太郎, Gatarō “river-boy”) or Kawako (川子, Kawako “river-girl”) , are legendary creatures; a type of water imp found in Japanese folklore. However they are also considered to be a part of cryptozoology, due to apparent sightings. In Shintoism they are considered to be one of many suijin (literally “water-deity”).