Takeru Kobayashi inhales a Coors Light

Coors Light, the “Silver Bullet”, a 4.2% abv beer first brewed in 1978 as a low calorie beer. It is Coors top selling brand, and the third-best selling beer in the United States. It has won several medals for “American-Style Light Beer” at the Great American Beer Festival, and is the official beer sponsor of the NFL and the NFL Network.

Takeru Kobayashi (小林尊, Kobayashi Takeru) (b. March 15, 1978) is a Japanese competitive eater and a member of the International Federation of Competitive Eating (IFOCE). He held the world record for hot dog eating for nearly six years, and holds several other eating records, and is the second ranked eater in the world according to the International Federation of Competitive Eating.

2007 Nathan’s International July Fourth Hot Dog Eating Contest

The 92nd annual [Nathan’s International July Fourth Hot Dog Eating Contest] was held on July 4, 2007, and was televised live on ESPN at 12 p.m. EDT. Six-time defending champion Takeru “Tsunami” Kobayashi was beaten by Joey Chestnut, who won by eating a world record-breaking 66 hot dogs and buns.

On June 25, 2007 [Takeru] Kobayashi announced on his blog that he seriously injured his jaw during training. He stated that he can only open his jaw about the width of a fingertip. Kobayashi’s participation in the July 4, 2007 Nathan’s contest continued as scheduled. He was able to eat a personal record 63 hot dogs, though his mark was bettered by Joey Chestnut.

Takeru Kobayashi vs Takako Akasaka

Other world-eating records held by [Takeru] Kobayashi include 17.7 pounds of cow brains in 15 minutes and 20 pounds (9 kg) of rice balls in 30 minutes.

Takako Akasaka (Japanese: 赤阪尊子 Akasaka Takako b. February 24, 1955) is a Japanese competitive eater from Osaka, Japan. She is considered the most successful female competitive eater in Japan.

Akasaka is known as an excellent long-distance eater, specializing in sweet food, which earned her the nickname “The Sweet Queen” or “The Queen” among her admirers.

The Japanese word gyōza (ギョーザ, ギョウザ) was derived from the reading of 餃子 (Jiaozi in Mandarin Chinese) in the Shandong Chinese dialect (giaozi) and is written using the same Chinese characters.

The most prominent difference of Japanese-style gyōza from Chinese style jiaozi is the rich garlic flavor, which is less noticeable in the Chinese version, and the fact that Japanese-style gyōza are very lightly flavored with salt, soy, etc. Therefore, they are always served with soy-based dipping sauce (tare) seasoned with rice vinegar and/or rāyu (ラー油, known as làyóu (辣油) in China, red chili pepper-flavored sesame oil). The most common recipe found in Japan is a mixture of minced pork, garlic, cabbage, and nira (Chinese chives), and sesame oil, which is then wrapped into thinly-rolled dough skins.